Jimmy James & The Vagabonds – This Heart Of Mine / Sonya Spence – Let Love Flow On 45 (Deptford Northern Soul Club) 7″

Code: DNSCR004

£11.99

Only 2 left in stock

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Jimmy James & The Vagabonds – This Heart Of Mine

Sonya Spence – Let Love Flow On

ARTIST Jimmy James & The Vagabonds / Sonya Spence
A SIDE Jimmy James & The Vagabonds – This Heart Of Mine
B SIDE Sonya Spence – Let Love Flow On
LABEL
FORMAT
GENRE ,
RELEASE YEAR
CONDITION
Weight 120 g
Artist

Jimmy James & The Vagabonds / Sonya Spence

A Side

Jimmy James & The Vagabonds – This Heart Of Mine

B Side

Sonya Spence – Let Love Flow On

Label

Format

Genre

,

Release Year

Condition

Two more floor-friendly 45s from the Deptford Northern Soul Club’s record box.

Including Jimmy James And The Vagabonds’ super rare £100-valued 45, written by Motown’s Barrett ‘Money’ Strong. A great version of The Artistics’ track on what is an obscure gem from 1966 from the latte day soul and ska hit maker.

Backed with the often-sampled smooth soul of reggae singer Sonya Spence on a Sonia Pottinger-produced track from her £70 album ‘Sings Love’. First time on seven-inch for this class slice of funky soul.

Michael “Jimmy” James (b.13th September 1940) is a Jamaican soul music singer, based in Britain, he has performed as the lead singer of Jimmy James and the Vagabonds since the mid 1960s. James grew up and began performing in Kingston, Jamaica, where he recorded as a solo artist with producers Coxsone Dodd, Clancy Eccles, and Lyndon Pottinger. His most successful release was an early version of “Come To Me Softly”, which found local success and persuaded James to give up a job with the Inland Revenue for a music career.

The Vagabonds were originally formed in 1960. James teamed up with them under Canadian band manager Roger Smith and in April 1964, they relocated to the UK. “Ska-Time” (Decca Records) was recorded as Jamaica’s Own Vagabonds within two weeks of their arrival, and is one of the first examples of Jamaican ska music to be recorded in the UK. Jimmy James and the Vagabonds supported The Who and Rod Stewart also sharing several bills with Jimi Hendrix’s band, The Experience, during the late 1960s when they were both trying to establish themselves. “We used to hang out a lot at clubs like the Bag O’ Nails, the Cromwellian and Whiskey A Go Go. A great guy, very quiet and unassuming,” James recalled.